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Medical

Q: What caused the massive E. coli illness outbreak from romaine lettuce? Some people who became sick did not report eating romaine lettuce, but had close contact with someone else who got sick from eating romaine lettuce. Scott Gottlieb and Dr. Stephen Ostroff, FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine, wrote in a statement . Yuma is the place where the contaminated lettuce is believed to have originated from.
  • "Relay for Life" event kicks off in Brownsville

    Medical

    This year, 13 teams from across Lee County have worked toward the goal of raising at least $90,000. Relay For Life of Aroostook this year shifts to a daytime format while keeping firmly focused on its mission to celebrating cancer survivors, remembering those lost to cancer and fighting back against the disease.
  • Nipah Virus: Kozhikode district schools reopening postponed till June 12

    Nipah Virus: Kozhikode district schools reopening postponed till June 12

    Medical

    Lauding the doctors in Kerala who had been prompt enough to spot the virus as soon as it appeared, Dr Wankedekar said that the Kerala government and the healthcare agencies did a great job by putting up resistance to the virus. So far, a total of 196 samples have been tested for Nipah , of which 18 tested positive. The MoPH has also issued a circular to all the communication officers at all the hospitals and health centres across Qatar on the standard definition of the suspected cases and ...
  • A New Reason to Be Screened for Colon Cancer

    A New Reason to Be Screened for Colon Cancer

    Medical

    The new guidelines lower the age from 50 to 45, following a rise in cases in younger people. Dr. Cedrek McFadden is a physician with GHS. Doctors also recommend stool blood tests, which are done every year. But there has been a 51 percent increase in colorectal cancer among those under 50 since 1994. A screening for colon or rectal cancer isn't always a colonoscopy, though that is usually needed if another type of test indicates a problem.
  • New blood test could be the ‘holy grail of cancer research’

    New blood test could be the ‘holy grail of cancer research’

    Medical

    It detected genetic traces of multiple cancers, including breast, pancreatic and ovarian, according to the study led by Cleveland Clinic in Ohio , US. It can now detect ovarian, pancreatic, liver, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, colorectal, esophageal, lung, head and neck, and breast cancers , but it works best for ovarian and pancreatic forms of the disease.
  • After Years of Making an attempt, Virginia Lastly Will Increase Medicaid

    After Years of Making an attempt, Virginia Lastly Will Increase Medicaid

    Medical

    In the end, three Republicans broke with their party to support expansion: Emmett Hanger Jr., Augusta, Frank Wagner, Virginia Beach, and Sen. Virginia Democrats have pushed for years to expand Medicaid , saying their state should not pass up the roughly $2 billion in extra federal funding the program would bring to the state.
  • Reason Why Middle-Aged Men Should Limit Their Protein Intake

    Reason Why Middle-Aged Men Should Limit Their Protein Intake

    Medical

    Over the course of the study , 334 cases of heart failure - when the body is unable to pump enough blood and oxygen to remain healthy - were diagnosed. (The men in the study were not told to follow any particular diet.) Then, the men were divided into four groups based on how much protein they ate, with the lowest group consuming about 78 grams a day, on average, and the highest group consuming 109 grams a day.
  • More deaths in the E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

    More deaths in the E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

    Medical

    It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in people's homes, stores, or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life. Officials said that first illness began sometime between March 13 and May 12. In an update Friday, health officials said 25 more cases raised the total to 197 illnesses in 35 states.
  • Smoking down, but tobacco use still a major cause of death, disease

    Smoking down, but tobacco use still a major cause of death, disease

    Medical

    Dr Svetlana Axelrod, WHO's Assistant Director-General for NCDs and mental health, says: "We know what policies and actions can increase tobacco quit rates, prevent people from starting using tobacco, and reduce demand". For today's World No Tobacco Day 2018 , WHO has joined with the World Heart Federation and many other allies to raise awareness on the link between tobacco and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), which are the world's leading causes of death.
  • Death toll hits 5 in E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

    Medical

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , 197 people in 35 states have been sickened in the outbreak. Officials say the people who became ill ate the tainted romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region when it was likely still available in grocery stores and restaurants.
  • Salmon Arm Relay For Life still running strong

    Salmon Arm Relay For Life still running strong

    Medical

    We're teaming up with the American Cancer Society to raise money and awareness in the fight against cancer. Last year, the Marion County event raised $108,000. Founder and the executive director of Bhutan Cancer Society, Dechen Wangmo, said the majority of the cancer cases were diagnosed either in the third or fourth stage.
  • Nipah Virus Claims Another Life In Kerala's Kozhikode, Toll Rises to 14

    Nipah Virus Claims Another Life In Kerala's Kozhikode, Toll Rises to 14

    Medical

    NDTV is one of the leaders in the production and broadcasting of un-biased and comprehensive news and entertainment programmes in India and overseas. The health ministry, in a statement, said that the efforts taken so far to contain the disease have been fruitful, as the disease had not spread to new areas.
  • Colon screening should start at 45, not 50, American Cancer Sociey says

    Colon screening should start at 45, not 50, American Cancer Sociey says

    Medical

    Richard Wender , chief cancer control officer at the American Cancer Society , who oversaw the development of the new guidelines . And, since most people do not start colorectal cancer screening until age 50, changes in screening rates would not account for the increase among younger Americans, he added.
  • 3D-printed human corneas could treat blindness

    3D-printed human corneas could treat blindness

    Medical

    Believe it or not, over 15M people a year need cornea transplant - only 44,000 are completed due to lack of supply. One of the most important of these is the cornea, responsible for focusing vision. By scanning a patient's eye, the doctors could further print bespoke corneas to match the patient's eye shape and size. A 2016 survey of corneal transplants globally found that only one cornea transplant was available for every 70 needed.
  • Walk and chew gum, it may keep you thin

    Walk and chew gum, it may keep you thin

    Medical

    The control trial involved the same 1-hour rest and 15 minute walk, however participants were given a powder to ingest which contained the same ingredients as gum, but did not require them to chew. It is said to occur more frequently among elderly people. Men aged 40 and older burned about two additional calories for every minute walked and women did not have a significant response.
  • Research: Taking vitamin, mineral supplements may not boost heath

    Research: Taking vitamin, mineral supplements may not boost heath

    Medical

    Then multivitamins were also included in the study , referring to supplements that had the most minerals and vitamins. A meta-analysis printed yesterday (May 28) appeared through all of the randomized studies from January 2012 to October 2017 on multivitamins, some mix pills which have a couple of vitamins such as calcium and vitamin D , and their link to heart disease.
  • Cockroach Milk Could Be The Latest Milk Trend

    Cockroach Milk Could Be The Latest Milk Trend

    Medical

    The Pacific beetle cockroach . The milk of these cockroaches is filled with the crystals rich in protein content which reportedly have thrice the energy of regular daily milk of equal mass. Their solution is called "entomilk", which is sourced from sustainably farmed insects. "Think of Entomilk as a sustainable, nature-friendly, nutritious, lactose free, delicious, guilt-free dairy alternative of the future", Gourmet Grubb said on its website.
  • Trump wades into furor over racist Roseanne Barr tweet

    Trump wades into furor over racist Roseanne Barr tweet

    Medical

    Now, in a series of confusing tweets, Barr claims she didn't know Jarrett is black. Soon after that, Barr's talent agency dropped her from its client list and Viacom announced rerun episodes of " Roseanne " will no longer be shown on that family of networks.
  • Can chewing gum help you walk faster, burn more calories?

    Can chewing gum help you walk faster, burn more calories?

    Medical

    There's an old insult: That guy's so dumb he can't walk and chew gum at the same time. The volunteers in the study walked for 15 minutes in two trials. According to a Japanese study, consuming chewing-gum while walking on foot is the surprise ally for weight loss . "Effective preventive methods and treatments for obesity are needed", the researchers said.
  • Ebola vaccinations begin in rural Congo on Monday: Ministry

    Ebola vaccinations begin in rural Congo on Monday: Ministry

    Medical

    Congo's vaccination campaign, which began in Mbandaka last week, is targeting more than 1,000 health workers and contacts of the sick in three health zones. Symptoms of Ebola include vomiting, fever, muscle pain, diarrhea, and external or internal bleeding. Ebola was discovered near the Ebola River, which runs through the Congo.
  • Disease related to tick bites have gone up; CDC issues prevention methods

    Disease related to tick bites have gone up; CDC issues prevention methods

    Medical

    People who live in or near the woods or spend a lot of time outdoors due to the nature of their work were considered to be at high risk of getting bitten. "Spring and early summer are peak times for tick bites, which coincide with people venturing outdoors in the warmer weather", said Jeffrey D. Howard, Jr., acting Department for Public Health commissioner.
  • Virginia's General Assembly passes Medicaid expansion

    Medical

    The Senate passed the budget, which now heads back to House, 23-17. The Virginia General Assembly on Wednesday approved expansion of Medicaid, the state-federal program for the low income. Once the bill becomes law, Virginia will join 32 states and the District of Columbia in expanding Medicaid. Senate Majority Leader Tommy Norment (R-Williamsburg) had pushed for passage of a "clean budget" that did not include federal funding to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
  • U.S. cancer group says colon screening should start at 45, not 50

    Medical

    The updated guidelines come in response to rising colorectal cancer rates and deaths in younger adults. There are new recommendations for colon cancer screening. "This was the first trial ever done of colorectal cancer screening in the world". But the organization noted the higher rate among older adults may be a result of increased screening in that age group.
  • AI better at finding skin cancer than doctors

    Medical

    For the study , a team of researchers from Germany , the US and France trained an AI system to identify skin cancer using 100,000-plus images, including images of malignant melanomas and benign moles . There is good reason for this, because unlike humans, computers don't get exhausted and they aren't biased, which is why sometimes AI can help pick up on things doctors miss.
  • AI better at detecting skin cancer than docs

    Medical

    It was shown photos of benign moles and malignant melanomas . To see who would emerge victorious between the doctors and the CNN , the team presented each with 100 skin lesion images and instructed them to make a diagnosis and recommended a follow-up action.
  • RECALL ALERT: TAYTULLA birth control packaging error

    RECALL ALERT: TAYTULLA birth control packaging error

    Medical

    The recall applies to sample packs used since August 27, 2017, with the lot No. 5620706 and an expiration date of May 2019. If the pills are taken out of order, women are at risk that the contraceptive will fail. May 2019 since August 27, 2017, and are concerned that you may be impacted by this issue, please consult with your physician. Allergan advises users who think they might be affected to contact their physician and arrange a return.
  • Cockroach milk could be the next non-dairy fad

    Medical

    Interestingly, the Pacific beetle doesn't lay eggs; instead it gives birth to live young. But the study has surprised many who are left in disbelief that cockroach produce milk. The milk found from the Australian native Pacific beetle cockroach contains all essential amino acids. . The company says that entomilk is rich in protein content, as well as iron, zinc and calcium.
  • UAE bans fruits from Kerala after Nipah virus outbreak

    UAE bans fruits from Kerala after Nipah virus outbreak

    Medical

    It is believed that the virus is hosted by the fruit bat , which is known to feed on mangoes, dates and bananas in particular. It also states that lab tests have confirmed that the virus spreads through chicken and the state health department has found Nipah virus in about 60 per cent of the chicken brought from Tamil Nadu.
  • Why cockroach milk is being hailed as the next big superfood

    Why cockroach milk is being hailed as the next big superfood

    Medical

    The weird fad superfood is made from crystals secreted by mother roaches to feed their young. So, while its relatives lay eggs, the Pacific beetle cockroach gives birth to live young. Besides for its unappealing name, cockroach milk is hard to come by. Following this development, Gwyneth Paltrow's website Goop has added cockroaches to their animal milk guide.
  • WHO's Congo Ebola plan assumes 100-300 cases over 3 months

    WHO's Congo Ebola plan assumes 100-300 cases over 3 months

    Medical

    About 100 health workers have been vaccinated there as front-line workers face high risk from the virus, which is spread via contact with the bodily fluids of those infected, including the dead. Its appearance in the northwestern river port city of Mbandaka this time gives it a potential clear shot at the capital Kinshasa, a chaotic city of more than 10 million inhabitants that lies downstream.
  • Record breaking temperatures possible on this Memorial Day

    Record breaking temperatures possible on this Memorial Day

    Medical

    As many who regularly attend Memorial Day events can attest, this last week of May often seems cool or pleasant with a normal high of 71 degrees and light coats often part of the day's apparel. A stray shower is possible, but the chance is very low. The greatest chance of rain and thunderstorms will be between 2 and 6 p.m. Monday . The driest day of the week (and I use that term loosely) will be Friday .although there is a chance of isolated thundershowers late.
  • Sleeping in on weekends is good for you

    Sleeping in on weekends is good for you

    Medical

    But channeling your inner cat and sleeping too much can be just as bad for your health , studies have found. For people under the age of 65, getting five hours of sleep or less nightly during the week was connected with a 50 percent higher likelihood of death compared to getting the recommended seven hours of sleep .
  • Hepatitis A Outbreak Lingers in Kentucky, Vaccine Recommended

    Hepatitis A Outbreak Lingers in Kentucky, Vaccine Recommended

    Medical

    The Kentucky Department of Public Health is handing out 10,000 hepatitis A vaccinations to the 10 counties hardest hit by the multi-state outbreak. Gupta said there have been 121 confirmed or suspected cases of hepatitis A in eight counties, majority in Kanawha and Putnam counties.
  • Higher Seafood Intake May Shorten Time to Pregnancy

    Higher Seafood Intake May Shorten Time to Pregnancy

    Medical

    Dr Audrey Gaskins , one of the authors of the study , said: "Our study suggests seafood can have many reproductive benefits, including shorter time to pregnancy and more frequent sexual activity". Women's consumption of seafood , however, is hindered by their fears of mercury contamination. A 2017 press release from Food and Drug Administration has already assured the public that 90 percent of the fishes consumed in the country is low in mercury and is safe to eat.
  • You could die early from this much sleep

    You could die early from this much sleep

    Medical

    However, for people who consistently slept for less than five hours through the whole week, the mortality risk is higher. The research found that individuals who managed just a few hours' sleep each day during the week but then had a long snooze at weekends had no raised mortality risk, compared with those who consistently stuck to six or seven hours a night.
  • Cops in Nebraska seize enough fentanyl to kill 26 MILLION people

    Cops in Nebraska seize enough fentanyl to kill 26 MILLION people

    Medical

    The driver and a passenger were arrested. Troopers searched the vehicle and discovered a false compartment located in the empty trailer. The compartment contained 42 foil-wrapped packages containing 73 pounds of what they thought was cocaine and 44 pounds of an unknown powder suspected to be fentanyl.
  • Antidepressants may lead to weight gain, British study says

    Antidepressants may lead to weight gain, British study says

    Medical

    People who are obese are about 25% more likely to experience a mood disorder like depression than the rest of the population - with poor self image, low self esteem and social isolation all likely to be factors. Participants were then monitored for a total of 10 years. The researchers also found that the risk increased during the second and third years of treatment as gaining 5 per cent of weight was 46 per cent higher than the general population during the second year of the study.