The Supreme Court won't take up net neutrality - this time

Adjust Comment Print

The administration on Monday asked the Supreme Court to take up three cases about Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA.

Cases challenging the administration's attempts to end protections for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children are now pending before the Second, Ninth, and D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The FCC, under Chairman Ajit Pai, abolished net neutrality rules in June, adopting the deregulatory approach favored by the Trump administration and the telecommunications industry. Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh and Chief Justice John.

"Absent prompt intervention from this court, there is little chance the court would resolve this dispute for at least another year", Francisco wrote in a letter to the Supreme Court. Until then, the government will have to maintain a policy that it believes is illegal and "sanctions the ongoing violation of federal law by more than half a million people".

Several of the plaintiffs in the case said the rejection wasn't surprising, given that the FCC has already repealed net neutrality.

"USTelecom will continue to support that order from challenges in Washington, D.C. and state capitals", the trade group said.

The legal moves reflected a desire by conservatives and industry players to cement the FCC's repeal of net neutrality rules, which were created to restrict Internet service providers' ability to manipulate loading speeds for specific websites or apps. After each of those cases resulted in nationwide orders against the Administration, the government filed appeals in three separate appeals courts. But the justices refused to hear the appeals, leaving the lower court ruling in place. In a related case, California's decision to impose state-level net neutrality rules is being challenged by the broadband industry and Trump administration.

"The last administration started DACA without a mandate or even an authorization from Congress or the courts; this administration can therefore end DACA at any time", Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a statement.

The FCC itself also was in favor of voiding the decision that upheld its 2015-era rules, according to Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat on the commission. The Supreme Court's arguments calendar usually fills up by mid-January, so, unless the ninth circuit issues an expedited ruling, it's unlikely the administration would have the opportunity to challenge the ruling before the High Court before next year.

Comments