Samsung releases the Galaxy A9 (2018), the first quad-rear camera phone

Adjust Comment Print

Less than a month after unveiling the world's first triple-camera smartphone in the Galaxy A7, Samsung has just announced the new Galaxy A9 as the world's first quad-camera phone. Dubbed as the Samsung Galaxy A9 (2018), it comes with a total of five cameras- four on the rear side and one on the front side. Sitting at the top is an 8-megapixel ultra wide-angle sensor with f/2.4 aperture and 120-degree field of view.

This allows for a variety of different shooting modes, as well as customised shots using features like artificial bokeh effects.

The phone will sit beneath Samsung's flagship Galaxy S9 and Note 9 phones released earlier this year as the best of its mid-range devices.

It will come in Caviar Black, Lemonade Blue and Bubblegum Pink.

Samsung withheld a good deal of information when it comes to the Galaxy A9 (2018)'s release date, pricing, and availability. Let us know in the comments.

That's a lot of cameras for one device but it certainly does peak a lot of interest to see how they would exactly work in real life. All of this will be backed by a 3,720mAh battery with support for Qualcomm's Quick Charge2.0 charging technology.

Samsung focuses on mid-range, amid talk it's making a phone, that's not the Galaxy S10, with four rear cameras.

"On the front, the Galaxy A9 sports a 6.3" Full HD+ (2,220×1,080) Super AMOLED display with relatively small bezels and a single 24MP front-facing camera (f/2.0).

All in all, the camera hardware on the A9 (2018) is impressive.

I got the opportunity to spend some time with the Galaxy A9, and here are my first impressions.

I'd love to be able to tell you just how those four lenses performed in the real world, but unfortunately we were only given access to pre-production hardware which was suffering from a few glitches that made the camera hard to really assess. Coming to the software, the Galaxy A9 offers Android 8.0 Oreo, and knowing Samsung, the Pie update isn't likely to roll out until 2019.

Comments