Hurricane Florence: 1000mm of rain forecast for North, South Carolina

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ABOVE VIDEO: A high definition camera outside the International Space Station captured a stark and sobering view of Hurricane Florence at 7:50 a.m. EDT on September 12.

This NOAA/RAMMB satellite image taken at 10:00:30 UTC on September 12, 2018, shows Hurricane Florence off the U.S. east coast in the Atantic Ocean.

A high-definition video camera outside the space station captured stark and sobering views of Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm.

Outer bands from the hurricane were lashing land on Thursday, at least a full day before the National Hurricane Center expects the slow-moving storm's eye to blow ashore around the North Carolina-South Carolina line. The NHC said this might bring widespread and potentially catastrophic flooding far inland, and forecasters predict Florence may dump several feet of rain on some areas of the East Coast.

Faced with new forecasts that showed a more southerly threat, Georgia's governor joined his counterparts in Virginia and North and SC in declaring a state of emergency, and some residents who had thought they were safely out of range boarded up their homes.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Twitter warned of the storm's dangers and praised his administration's handling of past hurricanes, rejecting criticism for its response to Hurricane Maria previous year in Puerto Rico.

Highways clogged with people fleeing North and SC early Wednesday as monstrous Category 4 Hurricane Florence rumbled toward the eastern United States as the biggest storm there in decades. From the comfort of the space station, astronauts can only look on in horror, but if you're in the path of this storm you should do everything you can to either get out or prepare for the worst.

Expected to make landfall by Friday, the impact of the storm will be widespread, with destructive winds, life-threatening storm surge, risky surf, torrential rainfall, flooding and the potential for tornadoes.

Although slow weakening is expected to begin by late Thursday, Florence is expected to be an extremely unsafe major hurricane when it nears the USA coast late Thursday and Friday, the National Hurricane Center said.

Bryan Wood, a meteorologist and storm-damage analyst for Assurant Inc., said that Florence will hamper businesses even after it degrades from hurricane status.

Authorities, including President Trump and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), are urging residents in the Carolinas as well as parts of Virginia and Georgia to evacuate as the storm continues its path.

Hurricane Florence is just days from making landfall in the Carolinas. Rather than pushing up toward western Virginia, the storm's center is now predicted to move across eastern SC on Friday night and Saturday.

Scientists are trying to get the most accurate information to forecast exactly where the storm will go.

North and SC residents are running out of time to evacuate before Hurricane Florence roars in with pounding surf and driving rain that will bring potentially deadly flooding, officials warn.

The storm is now expected to make landfall in the lower Outer Banks of North Carolina early Friday morning or possibly stay in the ocean before making a shift to the left toward SC.

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