FactCheck: What happened to Brexit in Parliament yesterday?

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Conservative former minister Anna Soubry said the abuse of MPs who speak out against the government's Brexit policy "simply has to stop".

He said that sometimes government had to act to protect citizens from the decisions of the majority, outlining why he felt the government's chosen course on Brexit would be bad for the country and bad for his constituents.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill, a complex piece of legislation meant to disentangle Britain from four decades of EU rules and regulations, has had a rocky ride through Parliament.

But in a last-ditch concession by the Government to swerve a revolt, the PM is indicating that it will put forward two of the three parts of Mr Grieve's amendment when the bill returns to the House of Lords.

Brexit Secretary David Davis has warned Conservative Party rebels that proposals to give Parliament the power to direct negotiations with the European Union are simply a tactic to overturn the results of the 2016 referendum that mandated Britain's departure from the bloc. But May is facing a potential rebellion from some Conservative lawmakers who want to retain close ties with the bloc after the United Kingdom leaves in March 2019.

Crucially, ministers have conceded that if MPs vote down the Withdrawal Agreement with Brussels, that will not result in the United Kingdom crashing out of the European Union with no deal - a scenario that few MPs would countenance because of the significant economic damage it would entail.

"We must under all circumstances respect the result of the referendum", Brexit Secretary David Davis told lawmakers as he opened the debate.

She says the way the government is applying the Sewel convention undermines Wales.

"It's not practical, it's not desirable and it's not appropriate", he said. Other flashpoints in the parliamentary votes include proposals to keep Britain tightly aligned with the E.U.'s economy.

Britain's highest-selling tabloid, The Sun, which is owned by Rupert Murdoch, addressed lawmakers directly on its front page, saying they faced a choice between "Great Britain or Great Betrayal".

Another source said yesterday that the October conference this year would be the "biggest beauty parade ever", with it becoming increasingly clear in their view, that the day of Brexit will be the moment when pressure on Theresa May will become untenable.

A file photograph of justice minister Phillip Lees.

With not all rebels persuaded that May's plan can prevent an economic shock after Brexit, some say they will challenge her plans to leave the customs union again during votes on other bills, on trade and customs, which will be brought back to the house some time before July 24.

"If we don't achieve a deal at all, the fact is we are going to be facing an huge crisis", he told MPs. May's Cabinet is divided between ministers including Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who support a clean break with the European Union, and those such as Treasury chief Philip Hammond who want to keep close ties with the bloc, Britain's biggest trading partner.

Talks with Brussels have stalled over the fraught issue of the Irish border, but both sides are hoping to agree a deal by October in time for the Brexit date of March 29, 2019.

A paper laying out the U.K. government position on future relations, due to be published this month, has been delayed until July because the Cabinet can not agree on a united stance.

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