Toddlers Consume More 'Added Sugar' Than The Recommended Amount For Adults

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A majority of children begin consuming added sugar even before their first birthday, suggest researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the results, the researchers found that numerous children in the study ate more added sugar than the recommended amount for adults.

"This is the first time we have looked at added sugar consumption among children less than 2 years old", she said.

The researchers got the data from the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

However, the study's results could be unintentionally biased as it was based on parents' answers, thus, it can't be taken as a 100% conclusive study.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has more on added sugars.

Most toddlers in the USA eat more sugar every day than is recommended for adults, according to a study. The research titled "Consumption of added sugars among USA infants aged 6-23 months, 2011-2014" was presented at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting in Boston on June 10. The earlier patient is introduces to high sugar consumption, the heavier the consequences he or she will face during the life.

Children between 6 to 11 months consumed 61 percent of added sugar but when these kids reached the age between 1 to 2 years, the amount of added sugar consumed increased between 98 to 99 percent. The Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020 reveals that sugar-sweetened beverages make up 39 percent of added sugars in an average American's diet.

How can people reduce their intake of added sugars?

Parents of 800 children aged 6 to 23 months were questioned on what their child's "added sugar" consumption was in a 24-hour period.

Dr. Herrick said the easiest method of reducing added sugars in one's own and one's children's diets is to choose foods that do not contain added sugars such as fruits and vegetables. In order to evaluate added sugar consumption, the researchers included any calorie-containing sugars such as high-fructose corn syrup but excluded naturally occurring sugars such as fruits.

The researchers say that at present there are no specific recommendations for children under the age of 2 years in the United States government's 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). The DGA will likely be updated in the 2020-2025 edition to include young children.

Despite these recommendations, however, a previous study shows that the majority of Americans consume more than what they're supposed to.

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