Trump backs out of G-7 communique, criticises Canadian PM Trudeau

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US President Donald Trump has continued his personal attacks against Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, tweeting that he "acts hurt when called out".

As the first of two days of meetings in La Malbaie, Quebec ended, the Group of Seven leaders limped toward something that could look like a win, even if it comes far short of the broad communique signed by all attendees that typically comes out of their summits.

"There remain good reasons to fight for the transatlantic partnership", she said, adding that the current round of trade tariffs that the U.S. and European Union have imposed on each other did not signal the end of a partnership.

"The other leaders presented their numbers and Trump presented his".

Elisabeth Wehling, a US-based political linguistics researcher, tweeted that the body language clearly pointed to Trump dominating the scene.

"We would hope that the United States will similarly honor the commitments that they have made", he said, speaking before a parliamentary statement on the summit by Prime Minister Theresa May.

The G-7 summit participants managed to patch over their disagreements and agree to disagree on some issues in a joint final statement.

Macron left his mark on Trump's hand after a firm handshake
Image Emmanuel Macron left his mark on Donald Trump's hand after a firm handshake

Expectations for a breakthrough at the summit, however, are low, with US allies focused on avoiding rupturing the G7, which in its 42-year history has tended to seek consensus on major issues.

Despite Trump's withdrawal and decision to double down on restricting foreign goods entering the United States market, Merkel insisted that she would continue to hold talks and work together with the president.

The chancellor also addressed concerns that Trump would hit back by implementing tariffs on German vehicles, saying, "First of all, we'll try and see if we can prevent this". If you look at what Canada, and Mexico, the European Union - all of them - have been doing to us for many, many decades.

Germany, Europe's top economy, finds itself in the sights of the USA president due to its large trade surplus and defense spending criticized as too low.

During a rare solo news conference earlier Saturday, Trump said he pressed for the G7 countries to eliminate all tariffs, trade barriers and subsidies in their trading practices.

French President Emmanuel Macron's Twitter account followed Merkel's post with this photo, showing Macron speaking to Trump and this message in French: "After a long day of work and very direct dialogue, we are actively seeking an ambitious agreement".

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