See the Xbox Adaptive Controller in Action

Adjust Comment Print

"On our journey of inclusive design, we have taken a wider view of our fans and a more inclusive approach to designing for them", Xbox head Phil Spencer discussed in the post.

This doesn't mean that disabled players have been pushed to the wayside but the fact is they have been forced to come up with solutions for their problems on their own.

Broly plays the game using his mouth to input commands in the game, which is very impressive considering that most able bodied gamers can't fathom the dexterity and reflexes required to input street fighter's more stringent commands. Despite this, more than one in three young, disabled gamers told us they feel excluded due to a lack of accessibility. That is all about to change. The Xbox Adaptive Controller is the company's newest product for people with mobility limitations, who were struggling to get a controller that could meet their needs at a low cost.

For now, it's hard to figure out if this photo is a promotional image for a new Xbox One controller or just a concept art to play around with the design.

Microsoft has confirmed that the Xbox Adaptive Controller will be launching later this year. As the name suggests it's designed for accessibility and targets gamers with limited mobility. It was developed in partnership with organizations around the world, including The AbleGamers Charity, The Cerebral Palsy Foundation, Craig Hospital, SpecialEffect, and Warfighter Engaged.

For more on the controller itself, check out the official page.

While the Adaptive controller carries the Xbox branding it can also be used with Windows 10 machines, so it has potential to open up more aspects of PC gaming to people with disabilities. There are a USB port and a 3.5 mm audio jack on the left side visible, as well, which indicate that this accessory can be connected to other peripherals like keyboards and headsets.

The device is as adaptable as possible so gamers can create a setup that works for them in a way that is plug-and-play, extensible, and affordable. The Adaptive Controller has 19 inputs on the back of the device in total, as well as three inserts so users can mount it on a desk, wheelchair or lapboard.

Comments