Volvo to eliminate diesel engines completely

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Volvo has confirmed its upcoming S60 sedan won't offer a turbodiesel engine.

Volvo is jumping onto the anti-diesel bandwagon, the Swedish carmaker announcing that it plans to completely eliminate diesel engines from its line-up.

The manufacturer previously suggested that its current generation of diesel engines could be its last, and announced previous year that all its new cars launched from 2019 would have an element of electric drive, either with a hybrid or fully electric powertrain. Speaking at a Financial Times event on the future of transport, Hafan Samuelsson, Volvo's chief executive, said that "We're not saying diesel is more dirty, but it is more complicated and more expensive".

As mentioned above, the new S60 will be the first new Volvo without a diesel option. Come 2019, every Volvo in the lineup will be available as a mild-hybrid, plug-in hybrid, or battery-powered electric vehicle.

The new S60, a premium mid-size sports sedan, is based on Volvo's in-house developed Scalable Product Architecture (SPA), which also underpins the company's award-winning new 90 Series and 60 Series cars.

It will initially be available with a range of four-cylinder Drive-E petrol engines as well as with two petrol plug-in hybrid versions.

In August a year ago the Geely-owned Swedish auto manufacturer publicised its target of selling one million electrified vehicles, stating that all of its new products will include an element of EV technology from 2019. The Charleston plant will be the only manufacturing location for the new S60, meaning American-built S60s will be sold in the United States market as well as overseas through exports. However, this likely means that recently launched models such as the XC40 will be spared from the diesel cull for at least the next few years.

But this is not going to happen overnight, as Volvo expects fully-electric cars to account for just 50 percent of its global sales by 2025 and even that estimation is perhaps a bit ambitious.

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