Sexually transmitted infections in California: Record numbers reported in 2017

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California hit record numbers of new infections of sexually transmitted diseases in 2017, with almost 300,000 cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis, according to a report by the state health department and published Monday.

Meanwhile, California health authorities are doing just about all they can do, with limited resources, to combat the problem.

For the health officials, the increase is more alarming than ever considering the fact that the number of sexually transmitted disease has increased each year for six years. The cases of syphilis and gonorrhoea are more common among men.

Rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea are highest in people ue younger than 30-year-old. Young women have the highest rates of chlamydia, while men have the highest rates of syphilis and gonorrhea.

As per the report released by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), over 300,000 cases of gonorrhoea, syphilis and chlamydia have been reported in the year 2017, which is a 45 percent jump in such cases from the data collected five years ago.

Klausner placed much of the blame for the overall STD spike on what he called the "decimation" of public health infrastructure since the 2008 financial crisis.

Myriad factors contribute to high STD rates among minorities, including lack of health care resources, said Center for Health Equity Director Heather Jue Northover, the Los Angeles Times reported. Los Angeles County alone saw congenital syphilis cases jump from eight in 2013 to 47 past year.

When it comes to gonorrhea, Kern is fourth in the state with 2,265 reported cases. More than half were reported among individuals under 25. This is up significantly from past year when 1,805 cases were reported. A third of all cases were reported among individuals under 25. In 2017, Kern County had 59 cases, down from 75 in 2016.

California tragically reported a three-fold increase in stillbirths from congenital syphilis, with 30 occurring in 2017. Untreated infections can cause health issues including brain disease, according to CDPH. Left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can lead to infertility and ectopic pregnancy, while syphilis can lead to blindness or even be fatal.

Early syphilis, which includes the primary, secondary and early latent stages of the disease, reached the highest number of cases since 1987, the agency found. In women, it can also be passed to the baby, called congenital syphilis and can result in stillbirth, early death, or long-term infection.

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