Avoid Eating Romaine Lettuce Again, Consumer Reports Says

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People infected range in age from 12 to 84 years old with a median age of 29. "This takes an average of two to three weeks". Last year, an outbreak of 17 E. coli infections were reported in 13 states across the United States, all of which occurred from November 15, 2017 through December 8, 2017. Three of those patients have a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is often associated with the O157:H7 E.coli strain.

If you've bought lettuce lately throw it out, chances are it will make you sick. Twenty-six (93%) of 28 people interviewed reported consuming romaine lettuce in the week before their illness started. Most people reported eating a salad at a restaurant, and romaine lettuce was the only common ingredient identified among the salads eaten. The restaurants said they used bagged, chopped romaine lettuce to make the salads. The CDC says all the victims were sickened between March 22 and March 31, with most reporting that they ate romaine within a week of getting sick. That's all the information the USA agency gives in that regard as it adds, "no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified". Numerous cases so far were contracted from salad mixes used in restaurants, but some cases have been linked to bagged romaine purchased in stores. "FDA should just advise consumers to avoid romaine lettuce until further notice".

The FDA, in conjunction with federal, state, and local partners, found that the chopped romaine in question was grown or originated from the winter growing areas in Yuma, Arizona.

The CDC reports that this investigation remains active, and that it will provide an update when it can. Our lawyers represent clients and families of children sickened with bacterial infections in personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits against retailers, grocery stores, food processors, restaurants, daycare centers, schools, and others.

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