Judge rules $560M Powerball jackpot victor can remain anonymous

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"Although the Commission seemingly contends that these are isolated examples, there is evidence suggesting that Ms. Doe would also be subject to similar unwanted communication", Temple wrote.

The court found that "disclosure of Ms. Doe's name would constitute [an] invasion of privacy", and moved to block her name from being disclosed in any right-to-know request.

The victor sued the New Hampshire Lottery last month under the name of Jane Doe, in a bid to collect the winnings through a trust to protect her anonymity.

"She was jumping up and down", said her lawyer, William Shaheen. But lottery officials had argued that even if the cash goes into a trust, the ticket will have to be submitted in its original form - complete with the ticket buyer's name and hometown. He did rule, however, that the woman's hometown can be publicly released, as it was "highly unlikely" that the woman could be identified as the victor exclusively based on her hometown.

"She got every bit of his money", Florida Assistant State Attorney Jay Pruner said in closing arguments during her trial.

She sued the New Hampshire Lottery Commission on January 29 for the right to remain anonymous when she claimed her windfall. Following instructions from the New Hampshire Lottery Commission's website, Doe signed the back of her ticket with her name, phone number and address. The holder of the ticket has since gone to court to preserve her anonymity.

Temple, who already agreed to let Doe collect her winnings through the Good Karma Family Trust of 2018 several weeks earlier, refused meanwhile to let Doe keep her hometown a secret. He said there was "no evidence" that the New Hampshire Lottery Commission was engaged in corrupt activity and noted that the winning numbers are drawn in Florida anyway.

Last week, the commission handed over $264 million - the amount left after taxes were deducted - to the woman's lawyers.

"While we were expecting a different outcome and believed the state had a strong argument, we respect the court's decision", said a statement from the New Hampshire Lottery. The commission hasn't responded to a request for comment on the judge's decision.

"The publicity from the [Bulger] case was minuscule compared to this case", Gordon said. "Certainly there was something about the luck of the victor, the right to privacy, [the question of] what would you do if you won".

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