Frida Kahlo: Row erupts over Barbie doll based on artist

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Salma is not the first to speak out about the Frida Barbie.

In an attempt to address the misconception that "Barbie doesn't need a job because she has Ken to provide for her", the brand released a collection of 17 "role model" dolls (AKA "Sheroes") for International Women's Day - representing "real women".

Mattel raised eyebrows, and indeed unibrows, on Wednesday when it announced that Kahlo - a brilliant painter famous for defying gender norms - would be included in its newest collection of Barbie dolls.

Frida Kahlo was one of the many notable women to have their likeness immortalized in a Barbie Doll in honor of International Women's Day, but Mattel's rendering of the famed artist has drawn more backlash than inspiration.

Calling out the toy giants for their questionable decisions on the doll, Salma wrote: '#fridakahlo never tried to be or look like anyone else.

"Mrs Mara Romeo, great-niece of Frida Kahlo, is the sole owner of the rights of the image of the illustrious Mexican painter Frida Kahlo", it said.

As the latest addition to Barbie's Iconic Women series created to inspire young girls, she joins aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart and NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson as the latest BFFs in Barbie's phonebook.

Critics have complained that the doll does not reflect Kahlo's heavy, almost conjoined eyebrows or unibrow, and they say its costume does not accurately portray the elaborate Tehuana-style dresses the artist wore. What could have been an important celebration of Kahlo's legacy, became a massive missed opportunity, and Hayek is not having any of it.

Over the years the name and likeness of the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, a fierce feminist and ardent communist, have been associated with a number of unlikely products. She celebrated her uniqueness.

Critics took to social media about the Kahlo doll, stating that it doesn't exactly reflect Kahlo in image either, expressing that her almost conjoined eyebrows are not accurately portrayed, her figure was not truthful and that the costume worn is not similar in respects to the Tehuana-style dresses the artist wore. How could they turn her into a Barbie, ' the actress asked.

Hayek was not the only one who raised her concern about Kahlo's image being used by a big corporate house.

In its interpretation of Kahlo, the company erased the art icon's disability and famous unibrow.

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