Turkey summons U.S. charge d'affaires over Syria: Turkish sources

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The US charges d'affaires in Ankara has been summoned to the Turkish foreign ministry over recent developments in Syria, sources in the Turkish foreign ministry said on Wednesday.

Ankara accuses US -based Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen of masterminding the putsch and has repeatedly asked Washington for his extradition.

But in a major potential obstacle for Sochi, Turkey says it will oppose any talks involving the Syrian Kurdish militia the Peoples' Protection Units (YPG), which Ankara views as a terror group.

Earlier, Ankara's Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu stated that Syrian armed forces have been carrying out attacks on the so-called moderate opposition in the province of Idlib under the pretext of fighting terrorism.

On Wednesday, Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said ties were harmed by Washington's failure to extradite Gulen and USA support for Syria's Kurdish YPG militia and its PYD political arm. In May 2017, Deputy Prime Minister Nurettin Canikli called the supply of weapons to the Kurdish forces "unacceptable".

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has also in the past called the USA arming of the YPG "a mistake".

Ankara has also summoned ambassadors of Russian Federation and Iran for expressing displeasure on Damascus attacks in Idlib.

Syrian regime's forces have increased military operations recently to impose control over Idlib and the Eastern Ghouta, the last two rebel bastions in Syria.

"If you're not giving him [Gulen] to us, then excuse us, but from now on whenever you ask us for another terrorist, as long as I am in office, you will not get them", he said. "Iran and Russian Federation", warned Cavusoglu, "need to carry out their responsibilities".

Cavusoglu said 95 percent of the violations in Idlib were carried out by the regime and the groups backing the regime.

Russian Federation and Iran have backed Syrian regime while Turkey has supported its foes, but, despite the differences, they struck a deal in 2017 to set up de-escalation zones in Syria, helping reduce fighting.

However, as the fighting continues, tens of thousands of civilians are fleeing the area, which is home to about two million people.

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