NYC, Long Island brace for winter storm

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The term "bomb cyclone" has been trending on social media as the storm threatens to push frigid temperatures as far south as northern Florida.

The National Weather Service tweeted Wednesday that snow, ice, strong winds, and flooding in coastal areas will plague much of the East Coast, spanning from Florida all the way to New England.

If you live anywhere along the U.S. East Coast, brace yourself for what is about to come: a nor'easter that forecasters are calling a "bomb cyclone".

But what does that mean? That's when a cyclone rapidly intensifies over a 24-hour period.

Called a "bomb cyclone" because its pressure fell so quickly and indicated explosive strengthening, what is resembling a winter hurricane will hammer coastal locations from Georgia to ME with ice and snow.

The major winter storm will continue to impact temperatures in Florida all the way up to ME which is expecting blizzard conditions. However, bomb cyclones can be unsafe due to the rapid intensification they bring and the extreme weather they can deliver. Winter Storm Warnings have been issued across the Florida Big Bend and south central Georgia areas.

All three deaths occurred in North Carolina from the "bomb cyclone" of snow and wind, including two men who died Wednesday night when their pickup truck slid off a bridge and landed upside down in a creek, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper said Thursday at a press conference. As the two air masses interact, the Earth's spin will help create a cyclonic effect called bombogensis that will cause air pressure to quickly drop.

Snowfall amounts in DE are dependent on the track of the storm, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Gorse. Five to 8 inches of snow is expected to fall with sustained winds of 20 to 30 miles mph, and gusts up to 50 mph.

"There is very high confidence on the general track and intensity of this storm as it heads from off the mid-Atlantic Coast toward Nova Scotia, which will get a direct hit of heavy snow and high wind".